Archive for the ‘ UFC 109 ’ Category

Spilled bag of ice is on twitter trying to make peace with Joe Rogan

The now legendary battle between Joe Rogan and “the spilled bag of ice” at UFC 109 has taken a bizarre twist.

Even though Rogan relentlessly pounded the spilled ice with a verbal onslaught of spinning back pro-nouns and rear naked adjectives ,The spilled bag of ice has set up a twitter account to try and squash the beef.

Follow The bag of ice and Joe rogan on twitter to get the live feeds!

spilledbagofice on Twitter

Joe Rogan on Twitter

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UFC 109 – Joe “The Squawker” Rogan vs. The Ice Bucket

Few battles inside the Octagon on Saturday night were as heated or personal as the one between Joe Rogan and the bucket of ice accidentally spilled between rounds during the undercard on Spike.

Frank Trigg’s UFC contract has been terminated following UFC 109 loss to Serra

Source: mmajunkie.com

It’s two and out for UFC welterweight Frank Trigg after his Ultimate Fighting Championship return.

After posting a 6-1 record to earn his way back into the organization and signing a new deal with the UFC in 2009, Trigg was notified on Monday that he had been dropped from the UFC after a knockout loss to Matt Serra at this past weekend’s UFC 109 event.

Trigg confirmed the news with MMAjunkie.com (www.mmajunkie.com) on Wednesday.

Trigg said he held off on sharing the news until he could notify family members. He said he’s undecided if he’ll pursue opportunities outside the organization.

The former University of Oklahoma wrestler and PRIDE veteran suffered a TKO loss to Josh Koscheck in September; it was Trigg’s first fight in the UFC since a submission loss to Georges St-Pierre at UFC 54 in 2005.

With that loss and the subsequent first-round stoppage defeat to Serra, UFC officials elected to cut Trigg from its welterweight roster.

Following that first UFC stint that ran from 2003 to 2005, which included a pair of title losses to then-champ Matt Hughes, Trigg (19-8 MMA, 2-5 UFC) fought for organizations such as Strikeforce, World Victory Road, HDNet Fights and ICON Sport, where he defeated Jason “Mayhem” Miller for the organization’s middleweight title.

The 37-year-old fighter and broadcaster then found a new life when he returned to the 170-pound division and strung together wins over the likes of Edwin Dewees, Makoto Takimoto and Falaniko Vitale to earn the new UFC deal. However, as with most fighters, the back-to-back losses prompted the walking papers.

As MMAjunkie.com reported earlier today, the UFC also dropped UFC 109 headliner Mark Coleman and heavyweight Tim Hague following the Feb. 6 event. Phillipe Nover’s termination has also since been confirmed.

Mark ” The Hammer” Coleman cut following UFC 109 loss

by MMAjunkie.com Staff on Feb 10, 2010 at 4:15 pm ET

Despite headlining the organization’s most recent card, UFC Hall of Famer Mark Coleman has been cut from the UFC’s roster of light heavyweights.


Fiveouncesofpain.com first reported the termination, which MMAjunkie.com(www.mmajunkie.com) has since confirmed with a source close to the UFC.

Coleman, a former NCAA Division I national wrestling champion and the first-ever UFC heavyweight title-holder, went 1-2 in the UFC after coming out of retirement and rejoining the UFC in 2008.

On Feb. 6 at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas, he suffered a second-round submission loss to fellow ex-champ Randy Couture in the night’s pay-per-view main event.

As MMAjunkie.com reported after the event, UFC president Dana White hinted at Coleman’s likely termination and predicted the Couture loss would be his final UFC appearance.

“I think tonight was probably Coleman’s last fight in the UFC,” White said. “I’m not taking anything away from Mark Coleman. I have nothing but respect for him, and I’ll say this now, too: Mark Coleman has always been a stand-up guy to me.

“He’ll always be a part of this organization. I just think he’ll have a hard time competing with the guys at the top level. Age is a factor with him.”

Coleman debuted for the organization in 1996 at UFC 10. The former collegiate wrestling champion introduced the mixed-martial-arts world to the ground-and-pound style that is required study in the modern version of the sport. He fought his first nine career contests in the UFC and defeated Dan Severn at UFC 12 to claim the first heavyweight title. He also won the UFC 10 and UFC 11 tourneys.

Coleman then took his services to Japan and made history as the winner of PRIDE’s 2000 open weight grand prix.

It’s unknown if Coleman will look to fight elsewhere or if he’ll call it a career with his 16-10 record (and 7-5 mark in the UFC).

UFC 109 Final Thoughts…

Source: bleacherreport.com

UFC 109 delivered last night, bringing some good finishes, surprising performances, and the introduction of a promising young fighter.

Randy Couture proved that he is the legend among legends, besting his Hall of Fame counterpart Mark Coleman, while Chael Sonnen threw his name into the ring for the middleweight title. Let’s break down the action:

Main Event: Randy Couture vs. Mark Coleman

Couture came out with crisp boxing and his always impressive dirty boxing. Coleman had no answer for either, as Randy picked him apart from outside and beat him up inside. Coleman survived the first round, but he got hurt early in the second.

Couture smelled blood and went in for the kill. Couture took down the wrestling legend (a little too easily) and immediately proceeded to tap him out with a rear naked choke.

There was great foreshadowing from Couture’s entrance song “Stranglehold,” and Joe Rogan who repeatedly claimed he felt Randy was looking for a submission.

This was a great performance for Randy, even if it was against a washed-up fighter. He seems to be slowly building toward another shot at the light heavyweight title. There are a lot of interesting potential match ups out there for Randy.

I don’t think Coleman has a future with the UFC after this fight. Granted, Couture is a legend, but Coleman just looks used, though his smack talk was as good as ever based on his verbal confrontation with Tito Ortiz after the fight.

Normally, I would say Dana White should hold out and put that fight together (because real bad-blood fights are few and far between these days) but would anyone even care about who won a fight between Tito Ortiz and Mark Coleman?

Ultimately, this fight was exactly what most people expected. It was a one-sided beating that will only expand Couture’s legend while Coleman’s career comes to a bitter, dark end.

Co-Main Event: Nate Marquardt vs. Chael Sonnen

This was the most surprising fight of the night. Most people expected Marquardt to come out with a solid gameplan of stick-and-move striking that kept the fight off the mat.

Unfortunately, Sonnen’s aggression sucked Marquardt into wild exchanges that allowed Sonnen to get the fight to the mat too easily.

Once there, Sonnen showed great top control, which everyone expected, but Marquardt had no answer with his jiu-jitsu, which was surprising.

Granted, he slapped on a couple guillotine chokes and even opened Sonnen up with an elbow, but ultimately he had no answer for Sonnen’s ground and pound. Honestly, Marquardt didn’t win a single minute of that fight until the very last minute of the third round.

Sonnen, looking worse for wear than Marquardt, put together a dominating unanimous decision victory. After thoroughly demolishing a fighter as talented as Marquardt, he should be taken very seriously as the next No. 1 contender.

This has to be very disappointing for Marquardt and is sadly becoming a disturbing habit of getting so close but not being able €to get over the hump.

Main Card

Mike Swick vs. Paulo Thiago

Both fighters came out ready to strike, but they both looked timid in the first round. Swick ultimately got a last-second takedown to win the round but neither fighter looked great. That all changed in the second round.

Both fighters loosened up and the striking picked up. Thiago landed a great counter left that dropped Swick. While Swick tried to just hold off Thiago while he recovered, he left his head open for a D’arce choke that Thiago used to turn Swick’s lights out.

Swick has now lost two fights and will slide significantly in the division. But this is a huge win for Thiago that should catapult him up the rankings.

This fight also proved that his fight with Josh Koscheck (lucky punch or not) was no fluke and he needs to be respected.

Demian Maia vs. Dan Miller

Maia came out ready to strike, which was probably a surprise to Miller. While Maia’s striking wasn’t devastating, it was effective enough along with his grappling in the third round to win him a unanimous decision.

This was a good win over a tough opponent to get Maia back on the right track. If he keeps improving his striking, he’ll be that much scarier for his next opponent.

Matt Serra vs. Frank Trigg

Serra came out and did exactly what was expected of him. He went right at Trigg and tested his chin with the bombs in his fists and he took Trigg out quickly with a brutal TKO in the first round.

This was a great win after two losses for Serra, and for Trigg this might spell the end of his UFC career for good.

Undercard

Mac Danzig vs. Justin Buchholz

Danzig went in and just did what he needed to do. He stood up with Buchholz until he could take him down where he had the best of it.

Danzig won a very tough unanimous decision, giving him at least one more fight in the UFC ,while Buchholz is most likely gone for a while.

Melvin Guillard vs. Ronnys Torres

This fight was very peculiar. Guillard was the better striker and got the best of it on the feet, but most of this fight took place on the ground. But while it was there, even though Torres was in control most of the time, he didn’t do much with his advantageous position.

The judges ultimately gave a unanimous decision win to Guillard, but it was very strange, given Torres had better cage control for most of the fight

Usually judges look favorably on that, but I guess they just thought Guillard was more aggressive and was doing the most damage.

Brian Stann vs. Phil Davis

Hello Mr. Wonderful! Phil Davis is a superstar in the making. He is a superior athlete with a fantastic wrestling pedigree.

Stann tried to out-strike Davis, but Davis was having none of it, taking Stann down early and often. Davis’ ground and pound was technically solid, but wasn’t doing a ton of damage. But he did enough to come away with a dominating unanimous decision.

Davis, much like Jon Jones, is going to be a part of the new wave of stars at 205 pounds. Light heavyweight is already stacked but a lot of the stars in the division are older guys. It’s good to see that there is some fresh blood being infused into the division.

Rolles Gracie vs. Joey Beltran

Rolles Gracie far and away had the most disappointing performance of the night. He came out and was gassed midway through the first round. I don’t know if his cardio was just that poor or he was suffering from something else.

In either case, Gracie was done when he looked like he had the fight won after getting into mount and then taking Beltran’s back. But Beltran escaped and then put the hurt on Gracie pounding him out for a TKO victory in the second round.

Gracie, who trains with Renzo Gracie and Greg Jackson, has to figure out what went wrong and quickly.

He brought serious shame to the Gracie name, and it will be interesting to see if the UFC has any interest in retaining his services after a performance like that.



Philippe Nover vs. Rob Emerson:

Emerson wins by unanimous decision, most likely ending Nover’s UFC career.

Tim Hague vs. Chris Tuchscherer:

Chris wins by majority decision putting Hague’s UFC career on thin ice.

Marquardt and Sonnen won fight of the night which was pretty surprising given how one-sided it was. Matt Serra wins KO of the night almost by default. And Paulo Thiago deservedly wins submission of the night

UFC 109 Fighter Salaries & Bonuses

UFC 109 took place Feb. 6 at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas

In addition to Couture, other top earners from the card included Matt Serra ($150,000), Chael Sonnen ($64,000), Demian Maia ($62,000) and Coleman ($60,000).

The full payouts included:

Randy Couture: $250,000 (no win bonus)
def. Mark Coleman: $60,000

Chael Sonnen: $64,000 (includes $32,000 win bonus)
def. Nate Marquardt: $45,000

Paulo Thiago: $30,000 ($15,000 win bonus)
def. Mike Swick: $43,000

Demian Maia: $62,000 ($31,000 win bonus)
def. Dan Miller: $15,000

Matt Serra: $150,000 ($75,000 win bonus)
def. Frank Trigg: $30,000

Mac Danzig: $40,000 ($20,000 win bonus)
def. Justin Buchholz: $8,000

Melvin Guillard: $28,000 ($14,000 win bonus)
def. Ronys Torres: $4,000

Rob Emerson: $24,000 ($12,000 win bonus)
def. Phillipe Nover: $10,000

Phil Davis: $10,000 ($5,000 win bonus)
def. Brian Stann: $17,000

Chris Tuchscherer: $20,000 ($10,000 win bonus)
def. Tim Hague: $7000

Joey Beltran: $12,000 ($6,000 win bonus)
def. Rolles Gracie: $15,000

DISCLAIMER: The figures do not include deductions for items such as insurance, licenses and taxes. Additionally, the figures do not include money paid by sponsors, which can oftentimes be a substantial portion of a fighter’s income. They also do not include any other “locker room” or special bonuses the UFC oftentimes pays.

White Not Amused with Ortiz-Coleman Exchange

http://www.sherdog.com

UFC President Dana White seemed as perplexed by Tito Ortiz’ interruption of Mark Coleman’s post-fight interview as the rest of the audience was at UFC 109 on Saturday in Las Vegas.

Ortiz, who is in town taking his second turn as a coach opposite Chuck Liddell on this season’s “The Ultimate Fighter,” caught the event cageside, and used his proximity to Coleman while exiting the arena to engage the former heavyweight champion verbally.

“F— you, Tito,” Coleman said mid-interview, moments after losing a second-round submission to Randy Couture. “Any f—ing time, Tito. Anytime, d—-bag.

Ortiz and Coleman had been originally scheduled to face off at UFC 106 last November until the Olympic wrestler withdrew with a knee injury. The 35-year-old Ortiz is now slated to meet Liddell a third time at the conclusion of the Spike reality TV series, likely at UFC 115 on June 12 at the GM Place in Vancouver, British Columbia.

“Tito’s calling out Coleman when he’s fighting Chuck,” said White at the post-fight press conference. “I don’t even know what to say to that. That’s Tito.”

White had well-publicized bad blood with the former light heavyweight champion over the last few years, but the pair said their bruised past had been repaired when the polarizing Ortiz re-signed to a multi-fight contract with the organization on July 31. Still, White didn’t hide his displeasure at Ortiz’ tactics on Saturday.

“Guy just loses in the most important fight of his life. This meant more to Coleman than anything to fight Randy Couture and beat him,” said White. “He loses, he’s standing up there doing an interview and Tito’s screaming sh– at him. Tito’s back.”